Demonise, Dehumanise.

The power of television, that debilitating, invading, superceding, all-consuming hold it can have on visions, imaginations and the formation of ideas:

You know the first and greatest sin of the deception of television is that it simplifies; it diminishes great, complex ideas, stretches of time; whole careers become reduced to a single snapshot. At first I couldn’t understand why Bob Zelnick was quite as euphoric as he was after the interviews, or why John Birt felt moved to strip naked and rush into the ocean to celebrate. But that was before I really understood the reductive power of the close-up, because David had succeeded on that final day, in getting for a fleeting moment what no investigative journalist, no state prosecutor, no judiciary committee or political enemy had managed to get; Richard Nixon’s face swollen and ravaged by loneliness, self-loathing and defeat. The rest of the project and its failings would not only be forgotten, they would totally cease to exist.

– James Reston Jr. on the final close-up on Nixon’s face in the David Frost interview after his confession of guilt in Frost Nixon (2008)

This movie is a must-watch for all journalists, politics-lovers, Watergate obsessors. and otherwise.

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